2016 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Thanks to its famous off-road grit, the Grand Cherokee’s expertise doesn’t begin and end in the concrete jungle like many of its rivals. A 295-hp 3.6-liter V-6, eight-speed automatic, and rear-drive are standard; a 240-hp turbo-diesel V-6 and 360-hp 5.7-liter V-8 are optional, as are three four-wheel drive setups, each with varying capabilities. A tidy cabin with touchscreen infotainment and optional Wi-Fi make the Grand Cherokee a pleasant place to be whether fording rivers or running errands.

Greenville1

The on-road-performance-oriented Grand Cherokee SRT features a 6.4-liter HEMI V-8 that now makes 475 hp and a 0-60 mph time of about 4.8 seconds. With launch control and a sporty 70-percent torque split to the rear in Track mode, it’s one of the best-handling SUVs we’ve driven.

The Grand Cherokee hasn’t given up any of its off-road talent; instead, it’s added to it in recent years. The most advanced versions can still clamber over boulders and logs with ease, and the new automatic enables a lower crawl ratio that suits the Eco diesel especially well. With three four-wheel drive systems, as well as the Selec-Terrain management system, which automatically caters the powertrain settings for the terrain (Sand, Mud, Auto, Snow, and Rock), you have a lot of options, so make sure you opt for the Grand Cherokee with the capability you need.

There’s much to love about the Uconnect infotainment systems in the Grand Cherokee (5.0- or 8.4-inch), and the system’s cleaner, simpler interface. A piped-in data connection adds cloud-based services like voice-to-text and natural-language navigation via voice commands. And the Summit edition includes every feature imaginable, including a 19-speaker, 825-watt Harman Kardon surround-sound audio system, including 12-channel amplifier and three subwoofers.
Greenville2Come see what makes Jeep so special at Greenville Chrysler Jeep Dodge Ram 5401 Interstate Hwy 30 Greenville, TX or give us a call at 903-454-0283 today!

 

The Jeep You Have Been Waiting For

No one does concepts better than Jeep, and who better to take those concepts and make them a reality.  Introducing the 707 hp Jeep Trailcat.  Yes, it has a Hellcat engine.

Greenville1

Colossal 39.5-inch BFGoodrich Krawler T/A tires, Fox shocks, and a two-inch lift perch the Jeep even farther above the pavement, and there are precisely zero aerodynamic elements added to the body to help this misshapen Titan missile tumble through the air. Since we imagine any high-speed run in the Trailcat would feel like riding a Hellcat-powered knuckleball, it’s probably a good thing Jeep sourced well-bolstered bucket seats from the Dodge Viper to hold occupants in terror-filled situ.

A custom shift knob with the Hellcat logo on it, Dana 60 axles front and rear, a two-inch-lower windshield, a domed and vented hood, tubular half-doors, LED headlights, and rock rails round out the Trailcat’s list of modifications.   It’s bolted to a six-speed manual transmission.  That’s the only data point that matters. Jeep says it lengthened the Trailcat’s wheelbase by 12 inches over that of a regular Wrangler to help the engine fit, or maybe to try to imbue this monster with some dynamic civility. But really, why even try?  The vehicle might seem unhinged, but you could almost call the Trailcat’s gestation predictable. Ever since the Hellcat engine debuted two years ago, we’ve jokingly prodded them to “Hellcat all of the things,” to stuff that beastly engine into everything.  We got our wish.

Greenville2

Come get more info at Greenville Chrysler Jeep Dodge Ram 5401 Interstate Hwy 30 Greenville, TX or give us a call at 903-454-0283 today!

All those Awards and a Great Comedian

In case you missed it, the all-new 2017 Chrysler Pacifica was recently named to Wards 10 Best Interiors List as well as being honored with top awards for “Best Family Car” and “Best Value” at the Family Car Challenge hosted by the Greater Atlanta Automotive Media Association.

greenville1

The Chrysler brand launched its new “Dad Brand” advertising campaign for the all-new 2017 Chrysler Pacifica in April. The multiplatform campaign features the real-life dad of five Gaffigan – with his wife and children – leveraging various all-new 2017 Chrysler Pacifica features to improve his “Dad Brand” in a comedic, tongue-in-cheek fashion, while highlighting the unparalleled levels of functionality, versatility, technology and safety features of the vehicle.

The campaign puts a unique twist on the standard brand spokesperson campaign, showing Jim Gaffigan as conscious and playful with his image, acknowledging the ways the vehicle itself is helping him with the upkeep of his “Dad Brand.” The campaign includes appearances by Gaffigan’s wife Jeannie (Gaffigan) and five children (Marre, Jack, Katie, Michael and Patrick).

Whether it is the family-room-on-wheels functionality of the all-new Chrysler Pacifica minivan, the groundbreaking, bold design of the Chrysler 300, or the simple elegance and extraordinary driving experience of the Chrysler 200, Chrysler brand vehicles reward the passion, creativity and sense of accomplishment of its owners. Beyond just exceptionally designed vehicles, the Chrysler brand has incorporated thoughtful features into all of its products, such as the innovative center console with pass through storage and sliding cup holders in the Chrysler 200, the industry-exclusive Stow ‘n Go seating and storage system on the Chrysler Pacifica and the fuel-saving Fuel Saver Technology in the Chrysler 300.

greenville2

Come feel the power at Greenville Chrysler Jeep Dodge Ram 5401 Interstate Hwy 30 Greenville, TX or give us a call at 903-454-0283 today!

2016 Chrysler 300: Highly Rated, Highly Valued

Rated by Kelley Blue Book at an amazing 10 out of 10, the newest model of the Chrysler 300 is here and ready to make a splash in 2016. Chrysler is looking to accommodate for your and your family’s need this year by offering six, yes six versions of their 2016 300 model. This allows for you to find the car that is in line with all you want out of it as well as the price you are willing to pay for it.

Greenville1

Throughout these six versions, you can get anywhere between 292 and 363 horsepower. When even the low side is high, you know you are gaining a quality vehicle. There are two different engines offered, the 3.6 liter V6 and the 5.7 liter V8, and the different versions of these engines is what creates the different versions of the car. The S 3.6 liter V6, S 3.6 liter V6 AWD, C 3.6 liter V6, S 5.7 liter V8, C 3.6 liter V6 AWD, and C 5.7 liter V8 are all of the engines offered. They offer horsepower between the range mentioned before as well as up to 19 miles per gallon city and 31 miles per gallon highway.

Another amazing aspect of this car is it has a standard towing capacity of 1000 pounds, so you can even tote some luggage on a trailer in the back on your way to the weekend getaway.

Come in for a test drive of our 2016 models at Greenville Chrysler Jeep Dodge Ram 5401 Interstate Hwy 30 Greenville, TX or give us a call at 903-454-0283 today!

2016 Chrysler 300 Limited

There are a number of large sedans on the market, but the 2016 Chrysler 300’s combination of luxury and attitude helps separate it from the pack. Indeed, when the original 300 made its debut back in 2005, it was about as brash as a car could get without actually standing up and slapping you in the face. The 2016 300 is a bit more subtle, with a stronger emphasis on refinement and upscale appointments, including numerous upgrades introduced last year. But there’s still something vaguely imposing about this distinctly American sedan.

The 2016 Chrysler 300’s assertive styling is familiar, yet fresh.

Part of the 300’s appeal also comes from its rear-drive platform (all-wheel drive is optional) and choice of V6 or V8 power. The V6 delivers adequate acceleration and good fuel economy, while the V8 provides 300 owners with the sound and fury of a good old-fashioned muscle car, albeit suitably tamed for premium-sedan duty. No matter the engine, the 300 boasts an impressively quiet and smooth ride quality. The 300S model comes with a sport-tuned suspension that can be optionally upgraded with beefier components for 2016, and although nothing can disguise the 300’s bulk, we’re impressed by how this big sedan stays planted to the road. Like a heavyweight boxer, the 300S can stick and move when it needs to.

The 300’s character may be unique, but you’ll find comparable size and comfort in front-drive competitors like the Buick LaCrosse, Chevrolet Impala and Toyota Avalon. The Avalon boasts smooth V6 power and an available hybrid powertrain, while the current Impala is a vastly improved American rival. Often overlooked, the LaCrosse continues to impress with its quiet, supple ride. The Hyundai Azera and Kia Cadenza, near-twins from South Korea, also compete well, while the rear-drive Hyundai Genesis may cost more but delivers a convincingly uptown experience. All are appealing picks for a large sedan, but if it’s luxury with attitude that you’re after, none can match the 2016 Chrysler 300.

No Video Content

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

The 2016 Chrysler 300 is a full-size sedan available in four different trim levels: 300 Limited, 300S, 300C and 300C Platinum.

Standard equipment on the base 300 Limited includes 17-inch alloy wheels (19-inch with all-wheel drive), heated mirrors, automatic headlights, LED daytime running lights and taillights, a rearview camera, keyless entry and ignition, cruise control, dual-zone automatic climate control, leather upholstery, heated eight-way power front seats (with four-way power lumbar adjustment), a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel and 60/40-split folding rear seatbacks. Technology features include an 8.4-inch touchscreen interface, Siri Eyes Free, Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity, voice controls, WiFi hotspot access and a six-speaker sound system with an auxiliary audio jack, a USB port and satellite radio.

Standard on every 2016 Chrysler 300 is an 8.4-inch touchscreen infotainment system with user-friendly controls.

The 300S comes with the Limited’s equipment plus an additional 8 horsepower and 4 pound-feet of torque for the standard V6 engine, 20-inch “hyper black” alloy wheels with performance tires (19s with AWD), a sport-tuned suspension (RWD only) and steering calibration, a dual sport exhaust, remote start, unique black-out styling elements, LED foglights, sport front bucket seats and a 10-speaker Beats Audio sound system. An optional performance suspension exclusive to the 300S features stiffer springs, performance-tuned steering and bushings, larger sway bars (V8 only) and upgraded tires.

Opting for the luxury-themed 300C adds the following to the 300 Limited’s standard equipment list: 18-inch alloy wheels (19s with AWD), a comfort-tuned suspension, remote start, LED foglights, additional chrome exterior accents, an auto-dimming driver-side and rearview mirror, a dual-pane sunroof, LED cabin lighting, a heated power-adjustable steering wheel with wood and leather trim, heated and ventilated front seats, heated rear seats, driver memory settings, a power rear window sunshade, a navigation system, HD radio and a six-speaker Alpine audio system.

Building on the 300C is the 300C Platinum, which adds 20-inch wheels (rear-drive only; AWD models stick with 19-inch wheels), unique exterior trim, a touring-tuned suspension (same as the Limited), adaptive xenon headlights, power-adjustable pedals, heated and cooled front cupholders, upgraded leather upholstery, an upgraded steering wheel and a 19-speaker Harman Kardon stereo (which deletes the power rear window sunshade).

Many of the upper trims’ features are available on the lower trims as stand-alone options or via various packages. Notable extras include the base Limited’s 90th Anniversary package, which adds unique badging and trim (including a special splash screen for the infotainment display), remote start, the dual-pane sunroof and the navigation system. Available on all but the Limited trim is the SafetyTec Plus package, which includes puddle lamps, front and rear parking sensors, automatic high-beams, automatic wipers, lane-departure warning and prevention, adaptive cruise control, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic detection and a forward collision mitigation system with automatic emergency braking (it also adds an auto-dimming driver-side mirror to the 300S).

Should you be considering a stint in the taxi business, the Livery package (Limited only) contributes such items as chrome mirror housings and door handles and a four-year/150,000-mile extended warranty.

Powertrains and Performance

All 2016 Chrysler 300 trims start out with a 3.6-liter V6. It produces 292 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque except in the 300S, where it squeezes out 300 hp and 264 lb-ft of torque. An eight-speed automatic is standard, as is rear-wheel drive. All-wheel drive is optional.

The eight-speed automatic transmission is operated via this unusual rotary knob.

In Edmunds performance testing, a rear-drive 300C V6 went from zero to 60 mph in 6.8 seconds, which is about average for a V6-powered full-size sedan. An all-wheel-drive 300C V6 needed 7.1 seconds.

EPA-estimated fuel economy for the V6 is a respectable 23 mpg combined (19 city/31 highway) with rear-wheel drive and 21 mpg combined (18/27) with all-wheel drive.

Optional on all but the base 300 Limited is a 5.7-liter V8 good for 363 hp and 394 lb-ft of torque. An eight-speed automatic and rear-wheel drive are standard. Fuel economy drops to 19 mpg combined (16/25).

Safety

Standard safety equipment on the 2016 Chrysler 300 includes antilock brakes, traction and stability control, front side airbags, side curtain airbags, a driver knee airbag, a rearview camera and active front head restraints. The standard Uconnect Access system includes automatic crash notification, on-demand roadside assistance, remote door unlocking and stolen vehicle assistance, while the optional SafetyTec Plus package (offered on all but the 300 Limited) adds forward collision warning and mitigation with automatic braking, lane-departure warning and prevention and a blind spot monitor with rear cross-traffic alert.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gave the 300 its top rating of “Good” in the moderate-overlap frontal-offset, side-impact and roof-strength crash tests. Its head restraint and seat design also earned the IIHS’s top rating of “Good” for whiplash protection in rear impacts.

During Edmunds testing, a rear-wheel-drive 300C V6 took 122 feet to stop from 60 mph in a simulated panic stop. That distance is about average for the class of vehicle, though we noted significant brake fade after repeated hard stops. A heavier all-wheel-drive 300C with less grippy tires took 133 feet to stop from 60 mph, one of the longest distances in the segment for this test.

Interior Design and Special Features

Although the inside of a Chrysler 300 may not feel as upscale and plush as a European luxury sedan, it has quality furnishings for a sedan in this price range and it’s definitely a good place to spend some time. The cabin is full of rich finishes and extensive soft-touch materials, and the various trim levels add visual flair with upgraded leather and two-tone color schemes.

On the technology front, the standard 8.4-inch Uconnect touchscreen interface is one of our favorites, pairing large buttons and crisp graphics with a logical menu structure. New features for 2016 include drag-and-drop functionality, Siri Eyes Free and a do-not-disturb function. We also appreciate the 300’s diverse array of audio options, including an Alpine system, a Harman Kardon system, and of course the thumping Beats Audio setup.

The 2016 Chrysler 300’s interior is generously equipped and trimmed with generally high-quality materials.

Given the Chrysler’s ample proportions, it should come as no surprise that there’s plenty of room inside for occupants of all sizes. The adjustability of the driver seat and tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel is particularly generous, while the rear seats are both spacious and supportive. Compared with other large sedans, though, the middle rear seat isn’t as comfortable or useful due to the rear-drive 300’s transmission tunnel hump.

Luggage capacity is average for a large sedan, checking in at 16.3 cubic feet, but the rear wheelwells intrude on trunk space a bit and may limit loading depth for larger items.

Driving Impressions

The 2016 Chrysler 300 glides down the road with the smooth, substantial feel of a big Mercedes-Benz sedan. That’s not entirely coincidental, as some aspects of the 300’s suspension design can be traced to the previous-generation Mercedes E-Class (back from when Mercedes owned Chrysler). The 300 remains unruffled even on heavily rutted pavement, though the ride becomes firmer with the 300S’s sport suspensions or any of the numerous 19- and 20-inch wheel designs. Depending on your local driving conditions, you may want to go with smaller wheels. Aside from the 300’s compromised rear visibility, which is an inevitable consequence of the car’s high beltline, small windows and thick rear pillars, it’s hard to find fault with how it drives.

Although the 300’s base V6 engine is adequate, we love the muscular thrust of the optional V8.

While we think the big V8 best fits the 300’s persona, the standard V6 is a decent performer in its own right, and it’s also pretty fuel-efficient with rear-wheel drive. Either way, the eight-speed automatic is smooth and responsive. Around turns, the Chrysler 300’s bulk is inescapable, but this sedan nonetheless feels planted and secure. That’s especially true of the sportier 300S, which is firmer and more disciplined in spirited driving. You won’t notice a handling difference between the rear- and all-wheel-drive models, so the choice there comes down to whether you want AWD for winter driving.

2016 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara

The above list of “Cons” reads like words we’d craft after driving something designed 28 years ago behind the Iron Curtain. You can almost envision whatever vehicle we’re talking about in grainy, sepia-toned footage with the occasional photo of Lenin and a ballistic missile parade thrown in for good measure. And yet, the vehicle in question is the 2016 Jeep Wrangler, a true American icon akin to no other. What else can evoke images of Ike driving through the liberated towns of Normandy, and fun-loving youth enjoying the never-ending freedoms of nature? Heck, the word “Freedom” is even plastered on a special-edition package and roof designs.

Yes, it’s this iconic imagery and general character that makes the Wrangler so appealing despite its many drawbacks. Besides its styling, it can go places virtually no other factory-built SUV on the road would dare. Its old-school mechanical underpinnings also make it oddly fun to drive on the road simply because nothing steers or behaves in quite the same way (and hasn’t in quite a long time). It’s also the only convertible SUV presently on sale (let alone a four-door one) and it’s definitely the only thing out there that’ll let you take off the doors and lower the windshield for those moments when getting smacked in the face by a moth at 45 mph seems like a great idea.

A purple Jeep? Sure, why not. It’s available as part of this year’s new Backcountry Edition.

Jeep also enjoys a lack of competition. The Nissan Xterra and Toyota FJ Cruiser are no longer on sale, so the number of livable, off-road-ready SUV alternatives that aren’t extremely expensive has dwindled to the Toyota 4Runner (still far pricier than the Wrangler) and those within the Jeep brand: the Renegade and Cherokee Trailhawks and the Grand Cherokee. The truth is, all of these boast better crash test scores, more secure handling and braking, quieter and more comfortable interiors, more up-to-date technology features and driving experiences light-years beyond a Soviet taxi’s. But only the Wrangler is going to evoke Ike.

No Video Content

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

The 2016 Jeep Wrangler is available in a pair of body styles: the two-door, four passenger Wrangler and the four-door, five-passenger Wrangler Unlimited. Each is available in three core trim levels — Sport, Sahara and Rubicon — with additional special models that are based on those trims. A vinyl convertible roof is standard on both, but a hardtop with easily removable panels above the front seats is available.

Standard equipment on the base Wrangler Sport is about as sparse as you’ll find on any vehicle sold today. It includes 16-inch steel wheels, on/off-road tires, a full-size spare tire, skid plates, tow hooks, foglamps, removable doors, fold-down windshield, manual mirrors and locks, full metal doors with crank windows, cruise control, a height-adjustable driver seat, cloth upholstery, a tilt-only steering wheel, a one-piece fold and tumble-forward backseat and an eight-speaker sound system with a CD player and an auxiliary audio jack. The Unlimited version gets a bigger gas tank, air-conditioning and a 60/40-split fold and tumble-forward seat.

The Power Convenience Group adds power windows and locks, keyless entry, heated power mirrors, a security alarm and an auto-dimming mirror. The Sport S package (two-door only) adds 17-inch alloy wheels, air-conditioning and a leather-wrapped steering wheel. Stand-alone options include heated front seats, satellite radio and a touchscreen audio interface (dubbed Uconnect 430) that includes a USB port and media player interface.

The Sahara adds the Power Convenience Group items, 18-inch alloy wheels, automatic headlamps, additional painted exterior body panels and trim, hood insulation for reduced noise, air-conditioning, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and satellite radio. The Unlimited differs only with tubular side steps and rear passenger grab handles.

The Rubicon derives its top-of-the-line status from its robust off-road equipment rather than its extra interior niceties. It starts with the basic Sport equipment and adds 17-inch alloy wheels, 32-inch tires, a heavy-duty Dana 44 front axle (matching the standard-spec Dana 44 rear axle), a shorter 4.10 rear-axle ratio (standard with the manual transmission, optional with the automatic), an upgraded transfer case with a lower crawl ratio, electronic front and rear locking differentials, an electronically disconnecting front sway bar, rock rails, automatic headlamps and the under-hood insulation. Inside, you get standard air-conditioning plus the leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob, coat hooks, a 115-volt outlet and satellite radio. The above-mentioned Power Convenience Group is an optional extra on the two-door Rubicon, but it’s standard on the Rubicon Unlimited.

Note that although the 4.10 gearing is a Rubicon exclusive, the Sport and Sahara are eligible for an upgrade to a 3.73 ratio, which gets you much of the way there. The standard ratio is a modest 3.21.

Also optional on Sport and Sahara is a limited-slip rear differential, while the Sport and Rubicon can be equipped with half doors that include plastic side windows and manual locks. The Sahara and Rubicon are available with automatic climate control and leather upholstery bundled with heated front seats.

Optional on every Wrangler is a nine-speaker Alpine sound system and the Connectivity Group, which adds a tire-pressure monitor display, Bluetooth phone connectivity, a trip computer and an upgraded version of the Uconnect 430 touchscreen (available separately) that includes a USB port, media player interface, 28GB of digital music storage and navigation. All trims are also available with a higher-quality soft top as well as a black or body-colored hardtop.

Then there are the special-edition packages. The Willys Wheeler is based on the Sport and includes a limited-slip rear differential, gloss-black 17-inch alloy wheels and exterior trim, special badging, mud terrain tires, rock rails, the 3.73 ratio, the Connectivity Group and satellite radio. The Sport-based Freedom Edition has special “Granite Crystal” 17-inch alloy wheels and exterior trim, black rear sidesteps, all-weather floor mats and special badging (plus a donation is made to the USO). The Black Bear Edition has the Granite Crystal exterior trim, rock rails, a special hood decal, special cloth seats and both the Connectivity and Power Convenience groups.

There’s also the Sahara-based Backcountry and 75th Anniversary. The Backcountry comes with special bumpers, rock rails, Rubicon wheels and tires, leather seating, heated front seats, Alpine sound and the Connectivity and Power Convenience groups, while the 75th Anniversary has special exterior paint and trim, 17-inch wheels, winch-ready steel bumpers and a “Power Dome” hood. Finally, the Rubicon Hard Rock is based on the Rubicon and has black 17-inch wheels and exterior trim, winch-ready steel bumpers, a “Power Dome” hood, red tow hooks, upgraded rock rails, black leather upholstery, heated seats, the Alpine sound system and special badging.

Have it any way you want it: The Wrangler can be ordered with a hard or soft top, two or four doors and in a variety of trim levels.

Powertrains and Performance

Every 2016 Jeep Wrangler is powered by a 3.6-liter V6 engine good for 285 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque. Four-wheel drive is standard and includes high- and low-range gearing. The Rubicon features uniquely short gearing and an upgraded transfer case with an extra-low crawl ratio. A six-speed manual transmission with hill start assist is standard, while a five-speed automatic with both hill start assist and hill descent control is optional. Towing is rather meager at a maximum of 2,000 pounds for the Wrangler and 3,500 pounds for the Unlimited.

In Edmunds performance testing, a two-door Wrangler with a manual went from zero to 60 mph in a quick 6.9 seconds, which is pretty astonishing given the languid acceleration of past Wranglers. The heavier Wrangler Unlimited with the automatic needed 8.8 seconds, which is fairly slow compared to other off-road-ready four-doors.

EPA-estimated fuel economy is the same for the two-door Wrangler regardless of transmission, at 18 mpg combined (17 city/21 highway). The Unlimited also gets 18 mpg combined, but its city/highway numbers are slightly different at 16/21 with the manual and 16/20 with the automatic.

Safety

Every 2016 Wrangler comes standard with antilock brakes, traction and stability control and front airbags. Front side airbags are optional. A rearview camera isn’t available, nor are other parking or safety aids.

The Wrangler has some of the worst crash scores of any vehicle presently on sale. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) awarded the two-door Wrangler its highest possible rating of “Good” in the moderate-overlap frontal-offset impact test but a “Marginal” (second-worst) score in the small-overlap frontal-offset test. Without the optional side airbags, the tested vehicle was judged “Poor” (worst) in the side-impact test. Its seat and head restraint design was rated “Marginal” for whiplash protection in rear impacts.

The IIHS also tested a Wrangler Unlimited, rating it “Good” in the moderate-overlap and small-overlap frontal-offset tests and “Marginal” for both side-impact and whiplash protection. Interestingly, the tested vehicle also lacked side airbags despite its slightly better side-impact rating, so there’s no data available on Wrangler crashworthiness with side airbags installed. There are no government crash tests of the Wrangler.

Interior Design and Special Features

The 2016 Wrangler’s interior actually has a modicum of style, particularly when the metal-look “bright interior accents” are specified. But at the end of the day, function triumphs over form. Although the upright dashboard provides clear gauges and sensibly laid-out controls, there’s a distinct throwback feel when you’re driving a Wrangler, evoking a bygone era when car interiors didn’t resemble fighter-plane cockpits. Sure, you can have touchscreen navigation if you want it — albeit Chrysler’s old, frustrating 6.5-inch unit — but otherwise, the Wrangler’s about as basic as it gets. Honestly, anything more would seem a bit out of place. If you want the latest luxuries, another Jeep is probably more your speed.

For better or worse, the Wrangler’s interior is decidedly old-school.

Rear passengers will face some challenges in the two-door Wrangler. There’s room for only two back there, first of all, and the low bench with limited knee and foot room can make longer trips unpleasant, especially for adults. Access is also awkward unless the top’s off, in which case nimble riders can just clamber over the sides. The Unlimited’s backseat offers room for three and conventional access via its extra set of doors, though it’s still not particularly comfortable or spacious. There’s not much cargo room behind the two-door Wrangler’s rear seatbacks (just a carlike 12.8 cubic feet), but the four-door Unlimited offers a useful 31.5 cubic feet, as well as a generous 70.6 cubic feet with those seatbacks folded versus 55.8 cubes in the two-door.

Putting the soft top up or down on any Jeep Wrangler takes patience, which makes the separate foldable sunroof panel an appealing option when the top’s up and you’re short on time. Security can also be an issue with the soft top. The optional hardtop, which features removable T-top-style panels over the front seats, is a smart solution for those who don’t intend to go completely roofless on a routine basis. Bear in mind, though, that the hardtop is heavy, so you’ll need a friend to help whenever you want to remove it.

Driving Impressions

If you want to dominate the off-road trails in your area, you’ve come to the right review. We specifically recommend either the Sport, Willys Wheeler or the Rubicon for this purpose. Why? Because the Sport is cheap, leaving plenty of room in the budget for custom modifications via either Jeep’s Mopar parts division or the thriving aftermarket scene. The Willys comes with added off-road hardware, including beefier tires and a limited-slip rear differential, while the Rubicon goes even farther in that direction and is perfect for shoppers in search of a complete trail rig right off the shelf.

Pictured: This Wrangler Rubicon would be much happier driving around about 20 feet to its left.

As for the Sahara, you do get an upgraded suspension with it, but you’re paying for the amenities and admittedly attractive body-colored paint treatment (optional on Rubicon) as much as the performance. Nonetheless, any Wrangler is a beast in the wild, with abilities that put other SUVs to shame. The Unlimited four-door may not be as nimble in tight spots as the two-door, but we’re picking nits. Just avoid the standard 3.21 gearing if you can, especially if you plan to put on bigger tires; you’re going to want the extra tire-spinning torque multiplication (and better crawl ratio) that the available 3.73 or Rubicon-only 4.10 gearing provides.

On pavement, however, driving a Wrangler can elicit laughs and irritation, or depending on your outlook, a perpetual sense of adventure. Simply turning left at an intersection will highlight the slow, vague steering and abundant body roll that’s truly unlike any other SUV on sale today. Higher-speed maneuvers are spooky. The ride quality is also rough, and even with the hardtop, interior noise is profuse.

Better news comes from the engine compartment. The V6 engine is a thoroughly modern power plant that gets manual-equipped two-door models up to speed in a manner that can legitimately be described as swift. The five-speed automatic transmission is fine, albeit behind the times in terms of gear count. If you are OK shifting your own gears, the manual’s long-throw, long-stick shifter and easily modulated clutch adds to the fun and novelty of what is already a fun and novel vehicle.

Why Reinvent the Wheel

For years’ people have been saying why are you trying to reinvent the wheel.  If it works, why try and fix it.  You have heard all of these sayings.  I finally have the answer for you.  The wheel as you know it is outdated and it don’t work if it is old and obsolete.  That used to be the thoughts when it came to minivans.  The 2017 Chrysler Pacifica just changed all of that.

greenville1

Back in 1984 when Chrysler introduced American families to this new type of van, it was a great concept and became quite popular.  But minivans have had a tough go recently with fewer families choosing them and then the SUV boom, one could have made the argument for them to go away entirely.

After seeing the 2017 Pacifica, I am glad Chrysler stuck with it.  This gives you something no other competitor has done to date.  On the upper trim levels, the rear seat entertainment for children is in the form of built in apps.  There are actually games they can play and yes one is actually called “Are We There Yet?”  If they are playing that, they aren’t asking you.

It also added a few features that have become popular as well such as the vacuum that is located in the center of the van with a hose that extends all the way from the front to the back.  Also added was the 360 degree exterior cameras and self-parking features.  If mini vans continue to evolve like this, I think they will be here for a long time to come.

greenville2

Come get more info at Greenville Chrysler Jeep Dodge Ram 5401 Interstate Hwy 30 Greenville, TX or give us a call at 903-454-0283 today!